Wales

Wales packs a lot of physical beauty into its small mass of land: its mountain ranges, lush valleys, ragged coastline, old-fashioned market towns and ancient castles Everywhere you go in Wales someone will point out a hill, church or a standing stone that has a story of its own.

Wales has over 600 castles, that’s more castles per square mile than any other country in the world. Shaped by the last Ice Age, some 10,000 years ago, the landscape is mountainous. Wherever you go in Wales, you’re rarely far from sea. There are 398 natural lakes in Wales, and there are more than 107,000 plant species in gardens throughout Wales.

A lighthouse on north Wales coast
A lighthouse on north Wales coast

In North West Wales, at 1085 metres high, Mount Snowdon is the highest mountain in England and Wales. Snowdonia National Park itself covers an area of over 2000 square kilometres and many people live within its boundaries. It’s not the only attraction in the region though.

The castles built by King Edward I (1272-1307) are a UNESCO World Heritage Site. At 1085 metres high, Mount Snowdon is the highest mountain in England and Wales. Snowdonia National Park itself covers an area of over 2000 square kilometres and many people live within its boundaries. It’s not the only attraction in the region though. The castles built by King Edward I (1272-1307) are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Snowdonia National Park in Wales United Kingdom
The Snowdonia National Park in Wales United Kingdom

South west Wales is best known for its scenery. There’s the Gower Peninsula Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty near Swansea and the UK’s only coastal National Park, Pembrokeshire Coast. There are two ferry ports that connect us to Ireland; Fishguard and Pembroke and our smallest City, the cathedral city of St Davids. The National Botanic Garden of Wales and the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park are both located in this region.

The capital city of Cardiff is one of the greenest cities in the UK, with many parks to choose from including Bute Park in the city centre. In less than an hour’s drive it’s possible to escape the city for the more rural setting of the Brecon Beacons National Park, the Glamorgan Heritage Coast or the Wye Valley. In 2011 Cardiff was chosen as one of the 10 best places in the world to visit during the Summer by National Geographic magazine – the only UK location to be featured.