The Cave Paintings at Lascaux, France

Containing some 600 paintings, Lascaux Cave in France’s Dordogne River Valley is home to perhaps the world’s most incredible array of Upper Paleolithic art. Prehistoric artists created the depictions of bulls and other animals on the cave’s calcite walls more than 17,000 years ago. The cave—and its artwork—was discovered by a group of teenagers in 1940.

The Cave paintings at Lascaux, South Western France in the Old Stone Age are some of the best-known Upper Paleolithic art, estimated to be 17,000 years old. The cave contains nearly 2,000 figures, which can be grouped into three main categories — animals, human figures and abstract signs. Notably, the paintings contain no images of the surrounding landscape or the vegetation of the time. Most of the major images have been painted onto the walls using mineral pigments, although some designs have also been incised into the stone. Many images are too faint to discern, while others have deteriorated.

Lascaux Cave Paintings
Lascaux Cave Paintings